100_1990

What do you do when you don’t know where the line is?

Here’s part of the merit in drawing things from new angles.  You have to rediscover some of the fundamental qualities.  Shouldn’t that heighten one’s powers of observation?

And the merit of doing studies generally is that you create an occasion for just living in the moment visually.  If you let yourself escape the need to have things exact, you gain the chance to strive after making them more exact.  I let go of the line in order to find it.  I let myself be willing to put it down wrong.  And each time you do that you increase the chances of getting it right.

But the other way of finding out the line’s location is to draw with masses instead.  I make a broad patch of color with some careless swipes of parallel strokes.  I estimate how large a swath of color to make.  Afterwards if I get a better sense of one line’s relation to another I venture to draw that contour.

blue jay turned

I notice certain mistakes.  I decide to leave them be.  To remove them makes the thought process too fussy.  I just draw over things, if it’s possible.  And if it’s not I pursue the features that remain.

The relative sizes and interrelationships of all the things are so complex and intriguing.  The precise curve of a line can be very beautiful and interesting to chase.

blue jay figurine and frog teapot different angle further (4)

I have other things on my mind sometimes.  But drawing is also escape.  Or, it’s as much escape as one is likely to get.

 

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