drawing for fun

100_3677 (2) after Aelst.jpg

Made a little copy from an art book of a detail of a painting by Willem van Aelst.  Used Caran d’Ache neopastels.  It’s fun!

And these little fruits help me think about the ones I place in my own still life.

Advertisement

the big sheet of paper

Where Fishes Swim in Clouds 42 x 51

Here’s the big drawing of kois swimming in a basin of blue Neocolor crayon.  It measures 42 x 51 inches and it’s on watercolor paper.  I mentioned in the previous post that I tested using acrylic varnish as a coating to seal the Neocolor, using a little test drawing.

Soon I have to apply that procedure to this drawing.  It’s going to be a bit of a nail biter.  Wish me luck!

of course there’s another one

seashell ginger jar honey pot sennelier finished (4).jpg

Seashell, ginger jar and honey pot on a blue cloth: my sort of art heaven.  I had to do another version of the motif because that seems to be who I am.  Edgar Degas hypnotized me when he said “il faut refaire la même chose dix fois, cent fois.” [You must redo the same thing ten times, a hundred times.]  Now I’m like a Degas Robot who redraws stuff ….

Well, there’s worse things that could happen to an artist.  The earlier one which I repost further below was drawn using Neopastels on an 24 x 18 inch page of Strathmore pastel paper.  The one above was made on a 16 x 12 inch sheet of Arches Oil Paper using Sennelier oil pastels. It’s very gooey.  Particularly as the sticks of oil pastel are old.  Lots of impasto in it, as you can see in the detail here:

seashell ginger jar honey pot sennelier finished detail honey pot (2)

And here’s the larger antecedent picture —

ginger jar honey jar and seashell

[The little square in the top middle of the uppermost image is the shadow from the easel hinge.  Oopsie!  Gotta rephotograph that one sometime or other …]

 

rich surfaces

frog teapot july 12 sennelier oilcard

The Sennelier oil pastel card paper was sitting in the pile from years ago.  When I first purchased the paper, I used it with Sennelier’s own oil pastels — and I didn’t really like the results particularly.  I’ve since found out about another artist who uses Sennelier card with Sennelier oil pastel to great effect — Benjamin Hope — so I might reconsider (though Sennelier oil pastels are a little pricey for my budget).  I already have some Sennelier oil pastels — but using them, for me, feels like going to visit the Queen.

Anyway, I am using the paper for the drawing above with Caran d’Ache Neopastel and I love the smooth effect.  It’s very rich.  Amazing how differences in paper affect the materials so keenly.  Thus I’ve found a use for the paper that I love and now of course I want to get more of it!  Even though the present tablet sat unused literally for years …

The great thing about good papers, though — they last!  Almost forever …

late night studying

study for the painting

I made some drawings using Sennelier oil pastels and Neopastels to continue getting acquainted with my still life objects and with one potential arrangement of them for the table in the Big Painting.  I just drew them as they appeared in an actual still life set up, which is slightly different from how they’ll appear in the painting.  But being descriptive helps me get to know the things better.  So I need some of that.

The blue field behind the objects now won’t appear in the Big Painting where they will be surrounded by the striped cloth on all sides.

study for the painting two

Still figuring out the separation of the seashell from the flowers through which it’s seen — though that will be different in the final arrangement too where the seashell, if I include it, will be a little farther back and maybe seen slightly more from above …?  Decisions, decisions.

 

hanging out with Paul Cezanne

after Cezanne 2

I went visiting yesterday to see my old friend Cezanne at the National Gallery of Art where an exhibit of his portraits is on display through July 1st.  I took my Caran d’Ache neopastels and made a couple drawings in front of portraits of his wife Hortense.

What an education!  How I could stand there all day and gaze at the delicate colors of his paintings.  Or, how I aspire to standing all day admiring his art.  Standing with the box of pastels tucked under my drawing tablet makes one a bit weary, but I must build up my stamina because the pictures are absolutely glorious.

Below is the wikipedia reproduction of one of the paintings I saw yesterday.

 

in praise of chocolate

chocolate plant Botanic gardens mar 18 18

When I was recently visiting the Botanic Gardens with my drawing group and I suddenly realized that I was standing beside a venerable, magnificent, and wonderful-marvelous chocolate plant (Theobroma cacao) — well — I had to draw it.

You don’t consume as much chocolate as I do and just walk blithely by such a significant, such an important — nay! ESSENTIAL plant without paying your respects.

How I wish I’d had time to draw it in more detail — because — chocolate!

indoor “plein air”

tree at Botanic garden mar 18 18

I went sketching with my sketching group to the Botanic Gardens at the foot of the United States Capitol.  Inside the enormous greenhouse you can do “plein air” sketching indoors.  Great option for cold weather for the faint of heart non-outdoors-persons like myself — though for the record the weather the day of our visit was magnificent!

Above is my drawing using Caran d’Ache Neopastel of a tree growing in the corner of the main gallery.

and another one

pond with lilies oil pastel drawing

So when I painted the pond in oil the first time, I also made a drawing in oil pastel.  I am really in Degas territory with this one:  “il faut refaire la même chose dix fois, cent fois” – you must redo the same thing ten times, a hundred times.”

I must really like this motif.