piling on the obsession

crepe myrtle drawing rehearsal no 2 (2)

Drawing and redrawing the motif to get myself revved up to continue painting — on this:

https://alethakuschan.wordpress.com/2018/01/17/crepe-myrtles-are-the-best/

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rainy day

crepe myrtle drawing rehearsal no 1

I continue to resist going forward with my crepe myrtles painting so I make more drawings.  The drawing stops on the right because I ran out of motif — would have to invent more landscape to fill that space — which might be an interesting exercise.

So it rains outdoors and rains a little in my head where I lack some of the pizzazz that propels a painting forward.  But it’s better to draw, if you’re stuck, than to do nothing. The drawing paper measures 18 x 24 inches.

Here’s the painting I’m endeavoring to unstick:

https://alethakuschan.wordpress.com/2018/01/17/crepe-myrtles-are-the-best/

band of roses

clump of roses oil pastel 11x14

I am redrawing things that are in the painting, reconnecting myself with individual parts of the motif to get myself ready to continue working on it, stitching the parts more securely together — or preparing to do so — since the real discoveries will happen on the painting’s own surface.  These are just ideas.

So I redrew the roses and then added the top of the clump of hydrangeas below these roses, just to help myself think about some ways that these two parts might connect.  These are the hydrangeas that I drew in the previous post.  The drawing measures 14 x 11 inches and depicts the flowers actual size.

Here’s the whole painting in its present form:

https://alethakuschan.wordpress.com/2018/01/30/also-around-the-corner/

The roses and the hydrangeas are located in the top left hand side.

 

preparatory preparations

drawing for garden no2

I love to draw.  And I find that drawing helps me figure things out.  For me, drawing represents one of the most direct forms of thought.  So drawing the large forms of the landscape helps me rehearse an image prior to painting.  I don’t always draw the scene first, but I often do and I always enjoy doing so.

For the garden picture I made three preparatory drawings, one which I’ve already posted.  Each of the drawings are like line readings and with each I feel that I know the motif better — just as an actor learns the character’s lines.

drawing for garden no3

It’s with the spare drawing above, though, that I felt I most understood the image.  I wanted to be able to render it down to its essentials.  And that makes me feel really prepared to cut loose when I start painting.

I sometimes make drawings after the painting is underway because in episodes of being away from the painting sometimes I feel that I lose the thread a little and drawing helps me get back into the world of the picture.  I pick up the thread again.

Even the spare lines take me back into the world of the picture again too — not only into the painting, but in this case back into the garden.

The painting and a link back to the first preparatory drawing is located here:

https://alethakuschan.wordpress.com/?p=20380

path through the arbor

landscape drawing first swipe 24 x 36

I made a little pen drawing for a new motif, but it wasn’t as helpful for thinking through the forms as the pen drawings have been for other subjects.  So I began a one-to-one drawing in oil pastel to use as my rehearsal.  It measures 24 x 36 inches.

And here it is further along —

arbor preparatory drawing 24x36

and another one

pond with lilies oil pastel drawing

So when I painted the pond in oil the first time, I also made a drawing in oil pastel.  I am really in Degas territory with this one:  “il faut refaire la même chose dix fois, cent fois” – you must redo the same thing ten times, a hundred times.”

I must really like this motif.

earlier pond

pond with lilies in oil

I had painted the pond before.   Not sure when this was — long enough ago that I had forgotten it.  Turns out it’s the same size as the one I’m painting now: it also measures 20 x 24.  The only difference is that it’s an oil painting.

When the acrylic paintings are finished, I’m going back to this one to do some more work.

I had rehearsed this motif more than I knew.  And it’s pleasing to see how close together the two paintings are to each other in overall forms and textures.